Scam Season

With the federal tax-filing deadline days away, and with many of us having already filed, it might come as no surprise to receive a communication from the Internal Revenue Service (IRS)—regarding a refund, money owed or even notice of the dreaded audit. But it’s also peak season for scammers who pretend to be the IRS, with the goal of stealing your identity or your money.
How It Works Scammers, impersonating IRS agents, call and insist you have an unpaid tax bill and you face arrest unless you pay up, immediately. They employ many ways to make the hoax seem convincing. They can rig a caller ID to make it appear that the call is coming from an actual IRS office, and they may even know part of your Social Security number. The call may come in as an autodialed robocall or from a live caller. The caller may also cite a nonexistent “federal student tax” that the target has neglected to pay.
What You Should Know• The IRS communicates mostly through the mail, including cases of delinquent taxes. Phone or in-person visits come only after multiple written notices•The IRS does not communicate by email or text message•The IRS never demands immediate payment and does not threaten to have you arrested if you do not pay•The IRS does not accept payment with a credit or debit card, or by gift card or wire transfer
What You Should Do •The best move is to hang up. If you think you may owe taxes, contact the IRS yourself and inquire•If you receive an email from someone claiming to be from the IRS, forward it to phishing@irs.gov. Do not click on any links or open attachments•Ask for identification if someone shows up claiming to be from the IRS. Actual IRS employees carry two official credentials: a “pocket commission” and an HSPD-12 card